Student Wellbeing

SPECIAL REPORT: BLENDED FAMILIES

Blended or stepfamilies, come in all shapes and sizes. Today, the term “blended family” is more commonly used as opposed to “stepfamily”. Although their original meanings differ slightly, today both terms are used interchangeably. This is mostly due to some of the negative connotations associated with fairytale characters such as the evil stepmother or stepsister.

The blended family is the fastest growing family dynamic in the world with one in five families now being a ‘step’ or ‘blended’ family. However, when families “blend,” it rarely progresses smoothly. Some children resist change, and parents become frustrated when the new family doesn’t function in the same way as the previous one.

For many step-parent’s, the greatest challenge lies in determining what their role is within the family. The process can be both rewarding and challenging. Children affected by the union of a new couple may not be excited at the prospect of becoming part of a new family.

Although blending families requires adjustment and patience from everyone involved, in this edition of SchoolTV, parents will be given some guidelines of real expectations that can help their new family work through the growing pains. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition, and we always welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Click here for the special report on blended families. is the link to this month's edition.


SPECIAL REPORT: EXAM STRESS


Students in their final year of school are considered a high-risk group for depression and anxiety. Sleep deprivation, diet and social media are some of the biggest issues faced by this group of teens. Therefore it is vitally important that a student's mental health is looked after as well as their physical health.

Keeping things in perspective for students and parents alike, can help prevent everyone getting overwhelmed. Although this final year is important, it is not necessarily the most important year of your child's life.

There are many strategies that students can implement to help themselves. Parents can provide support, not only emotionally, but also practically by keeping their child well-nourished and encouraging physical activity.

In this special report, parents will find useful tips to support their child during this often stressful time. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered here and we always welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about your child, please contact the school counsellor for further information.

Click here for the special report on Exam Stress. 

SPECIAL REPORT: The Hunting - TV Series

‘The Hunting’ is a drama series following the lives of four young Australians as they explore the complexities of relationships, identity and sexuality via technology. The series follows the lead up, revelation and aftermath of an inappropriate teen photo scandal and the impact it has on the students, teachers and families involved.

Research shows that young people are increasingly exploring their sexuality online. A report from La Trobe University states that 26% of teens have sent a nude or sexual image, or video, of themselves to someone else.

The aim of this series is to promote discussion and awareness in an attempt to minimise harm. Experts suggest that conversations about online safety should start in the home and should occur as soon as a parent hands over a mobile device to a child. This should be then constantly reinforced throughout their educational journey.

In this Special Report, parents and care givers will be encouraged to have conversations with their children about the issues of online safety and the potential harm of image sharing and cyberbullying. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this Special Report, and as always, we welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Click here for the special report on The Hunting.

SPECIAL REPORT: E-cigarettes and Vaping

E-cigarettes and vaping are quickly gaining in popularity, especially amongst teenagers. Manufacturers of these products are deploying sophisticated marketing campaigns in an attempt to glamorise and promote smoking to young people.

Vaping is the act of inhaling and exhaling the vapour produced by the heated nicotine liquid of an e-cigarette or vape pen. Many teens believe that vaping is less harmful than smoking as it is often formulated with flavourings to appeal to younger users. Be aware that e-cigarettes stating 0 mg of nicotine, may still contain nicotine. It is a highly addictive substance that can slow the brain development in kids affecting their memory, concentration, learning and mood. Because vaping is new, the short and long-term health effects remain unknown.

However, studies have shown that kids who have tried vaping, are more likely to smoke tobacco products later in life than kids who have not tried vaping. As e-cigarettes leave little odour, they are particularly easy to conceal and use discreetly in public places, even in schools.

In this Special Report, parents and care givers will be provided with the facts relating to e-cigarettes and vaping, whilst also highlighting the potential dangers and surrounding legislation. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this Special Report, and as always, we welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Click here for the special report on E-cigarettes and Vaping

Positive Parenting

Despite the best efforts of parents around the world, the reality is, there is no such thing as the ‘perfect parent’. However, arming yourself with the right information is a good start!

Research shows, that one of the most important protective factors in the lives of young people, is a close relationship with a supportive adult. With the mental health of today’s young people being at an all-time low, it is simply not enough to parent effectively. Parents need to familiarise themselves with practical skills, knowledge and strategies when it comes to raising children.

Many parents today are over-protective, resulting in children being less independent, unable to problem-solve or self-regulate. Parents are failing to set clear boundaries, which is unfortunately making kids feel less secure. There is too much pressure on kids today. Parents fill their days with too many activities in an effort to avoid their child’s boredom.

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents will learn what is the best approach for primary and secondary school-aged children. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition, and we always welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Click here for this months edition of positive parenting. 

SPECIAL REPORT: Parenting Styles - What type of parent are you?

There are so many different opinions offered on how best to parent. New parents will often have firm beliefs about how they wish to balance love and discipline, but this ideal often goes out the window when a toddler throws their first tantrum in the supermarket!

Raising children can bring parents and caregivers great joy despite many learning ‘on the job’ and growing into the role through experience and understanding. Children will always flourish in a warm and loving environment, supported by clear guidance.

In this Special Report, parents and caregivers can gain a greater understanding of the four defined parenting styles by taking part in the quiz. It can guide parents towards deciding which style they wish to adopt and the effects it may have on their children.

We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this Special Report, and as always, we welcome your feedback. If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Click here for the special report

Trauma

Children and teens will experience events during their lives that will affect them emotionally and physically. How they react to these events depends on their age, personality and past experiences. Children can experience strong feelings of fear, sadness, guilt, anger or grief, making it difficult for them to cope with everyday life.

There are a number of ways that parents and care givers can support children after a traumatic event. Your reaction to an event, will impact your child’s ability to cope and recover. Children will look to the adults in their lives to help them better understand a traumatic event so it is important to ‘tune in’ to their fears and provide them with the comfort and support they need.

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents will learn how to gain a better understanding of trauma and how it affects children of all ages. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition, and we always welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Click here for the Trauma edition 

Grief & Loss

Grief is a natural response to loss. It might be the loss of a loved one, relationship or even a pet. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief is likely to be. Children and adults grieve differently due to their developmental stage, and this can prove difficult for parents to understand.

Young children fluctuate in and out of the stages of grief rapidly, as they may not comprehend the permanency death. They express their grief more physically. Teens on the other hand may not know how to express their grief and will need some space to process their loss. Some may choose to grieve alone, not wanting to stand out or be seen as not coping. Whilst others, who may have a greater understanding, can start to question their own mortality.

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents can learn how to acknowledge their child’s feelings and the best way to support them through the grief. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition and we always welcome your feedback.

If you have any concerns about your child, please contact the school counsellor for further information.

Click here for the Grief & Loss edition 

Surviving Year 12


The final year of secondary school is a year of hard work and a huge commitment for students. With so much going on it can be hard to find the balance between study and life. It is a time when personalities start to emerge, there are more complex interpersonal relationships and there is the pressure to perform academically. With all of this going on, it’s not surprising that some students have an emotional response and it is therefore extremely important for parents to know how to support their children during this time.

Some kids will need more support than others. Keeping the communication lines open with your child, their teachers, mentors and other parents will be crucial. Being aware of your child’s mental and physical wellbeing can play a vital role in their success.

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents will discover practical advice for students and parents to help get through the final year of secondary school. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition and we always welcome your feedback.

If you have any concerns about your child, please contact the school counsellor for further information.

Click here for the Surviving Year 12 edition.

  

School Transitions

Whether it is starting school for the first time, moving up to a higher grade or embarking on a journey through secondary school, there is no doubt that any school transition is a very exciting time for children and parents. It means your children are growing up!

However, transitioning is an ongoing process. It can continue long after students have entered their new environment and may encounter difficulties at a number of different stages. These stressors may appear as anxiety and frustration and result in negative or disruptive behaviours. Such behaviours can become problematic making the transitioning process even more difficult for children and parents.

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents will learn practical strategies to assist your child during the transition process and reduce stress and anxiety levels. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month's edition and we always welcome your feedback.

If you have any concerns about your child, please contact the school counsellor for further information.

Click here for the School Transitions edition.